Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
A chicken salad sandwich sounds great for lunch, but the sandwich part is out of the question if you’re eating paleo. This recipe for a healthy alternative adds a fiber boost in the form of diced vegetables, like radishes and cabbage. If you pack along four or five large butter lettuce leaves, you can leave your fork at home and scoop up the chicken with them.

This recipe gives you dinner party elegance in a 20-minute dish. We rely on sea bass, a tender, mild-flavored fish with a lovely buttery quality. There are several sustainable options to choose from (Atlantic black sea bass, for one), so ask questions at the fish counter to ensure you're making a responsible choice. You can also use cod, sablefish (also called black cod), striped bass, or barramundi with great results.


Dyed clothes came into fashion in early Iron Age Legendary Viking town unearthed Organic tools found in Stone Age camp Stone Age cartoons We buy healthier food than in previous generations How agriculture came to Scandinavia Unique find at Viking burial place Immigration in the Viking era Vikings grew barley in Greenland Low carb diets rocked in the Stone Age Denmark’s past viewed from above

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This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.

At last, here is a comprehensive cookbook to the hottest eating plan around! The Paleo diet—known in some circles as the “Caveman ...Diet”—is an eating plan based on evolutionary biology and backed up by medical research. The Paleo diet is based on what our ancestors ate: meats and fish, nuts and seeds, and naturally grown fruits and vegetables.In her bestselling 500 Paleo Recipes, low-carb queen and author Dana Carpender shows how to stay the Paleo diet course deliciously with 500 easy-to-prepare recipes for everything Paleo from appetizers, to main dishes, to desserts.This group of recipes for breakfast comes from that book and includes:The Best Way to Hard Boil EggsCreamed Mushroom OmeletWake-Up EggsCajun EggsPortobellos with Guacamole and EggsPoached Eggs on Mushroom, Onions, and Chicken LiversPaleo Hot CerealFlax and Coconut Muffin-in-a-MugBlueberry PancakesBanana Fritters read more


These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
Now, you never have to worry about becoming bored with your meal planning again.  This book awakens new ideas on how to cook naturally, with raw, organic ingredients.  If you’re just starting out on this journey you’ll be amazed at the many delicious meals and snacks provided here, within these pages.  If you want an abundance of quick and easy recipes, and all of them to be good for you then this is a great recipe book.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
They are snippets of my life and family. They show how I live as someone who eats and lives a primarily Paleo diet and lifestyle. It's real. I don't have the energy nor desire to dress these up and make them fake. You'll see me without makeup (some days), my kitchen messy, me eating stuff I shouldn't. You'll also see me give you tips on making things easier, things I like, and ideas for what to eat or do. And some days they won't have a darn thing to do with Paleo, health, or wellness – it'll just be me and my life.
I went on Saturday morning and I excitedly told the young girl about finding your blog. The owner was out at the farmers market. I got the chicken salad wrap….delish! I purchases the paleo wraps and can’t wait to make my own this week. I am new paleo….I’ve tried many ways of eating…from raw to lord knows what. I’m 56 in pretty good health but have a bad hip. I need to loose about 20 pounds and want to do it healthfully and have the weight stay off and this be a lifestyle. I’ll be following your blog and maybe I’ll see you at Vive!
The Nom Nom Paleo book brings humor and play into the kitchen. Created by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong, the married couple behind the Nom Nom Paleo food blog, this book contains over 100 foolproof recipes in this paleo diet cookbook that are great for all the family. Just in case gorgeous photos aren’t enough, this book also comes with cute cartoons.

With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.

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