Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
Get real energy from natural sources with these coconut almond energy bars. Forget energy drinks or energy bars sold in stores. That’s all phoney baloney parlor tricks that make your heart race a little faster so you think you have more energy. But what happens later is you crash and have even less energy than when you started. These bars are filled with almonds and other wholesome foods, taste amazing, and give you that get up and go you need during the day.

Get the taste of Thailand in a turkey burger so you can cut out a lot of the fat that comes with beef. On Paleo you want to mix up the type of meat you’re eating, and turkey makes a great choice. It will still give you protein and a savory flavor, and can be a nice respite from beef. In this burger they have red chilli and ginger being used to try to capture some of the Thai flavor, and they’ve served it open-faced on slice of Paleo bread. The avocado on top is a nice addition, it cools off the spices and adds fiber and potassium.

Description: Low-fat or low-carb? A recent New York Times Magazine (July 7, 2002) cover story answered this question and said that Dr. Atkins was right all along, “its not fat that makes us fat but carbohydrates.” Though the government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in research trying to prove that fat is the cause of obesity, there has been a subtle shift in the scientific consensus over the past five years supporting what the low-carb diet doctors have been saying all along: if we eat less carbohydrates, we will lose weight and live longer.
These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.
The main limitation to mention is the layout. In particular, the overall design and font size means that some parts of the recipes are hard to read – especially if you’re trying to follow the recipe while cooking. The problem may not be dramatic for everybody but it would be a particularly significant issue for anybody with even minor vision challenges.
One of the best features of this book is that it has pairing and variations of ingredients that you can use. And if you're going Paleo, sometimes it can be hard to pick what ingredients are Paleo "compatible" that are available on your cupboard or available in a local grocery near you. The meals are easy to prepare and delicious. This book emphasizes on meal planning and preparation which helps you save a lot of time.​
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