Description: Low-fat or low-carb? A recent New York Times Magazine (July 7, 2002) cover story answered this question and said that Dr. Atkins was right all along, “its not fat that makes us fat but carbohydrates.” Though the government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in research trying to prove that fat is the cause of obesity, there has been a subtle shift in the scientific consensus over the past five years supporting what the low-carb diet doctors have been saying all along: if we eat less carbohydrates, we will lose weight and live longer.
OMG. That's Paleo? features 30 new recipes never seen before on author Juli Bauer's blog, paleomg.com, as well as a selection of h...er best blog recipes. Sections include poultry, beef, pork, fish/seafood, slow cooker, sweet and savory breakfasts, baked goods, 5-ingredient meals, side dishes, snacks and desserts; and each recipe features a color photo. Juli also writes about the paleo diet in general and why it works for her, suggestions for keeping a kitchen well stocked, and recommended resources for further reading. And just like her blog, you can expect plenty of funny stories and awkward moments. read more
The books I've supplied for you here are excellent resources to get you started, and you can do a quick Google search online for even more info about the diet itself if you'd like. I congratulate any person who is making or has already made the switch to a happier and healthier life, and I welcome you to the clean life. Living Paleo is living better, and that's all there is to it!

Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.
This dish is inspired by Kaldereta, a dish from the Philippines that is generally made with goat shoulders and liverwurst. They’ve replaced the goat shoulders with beef, but they’ve kept the liverwurst which is a good way to incorporate some organ meat into your caveman diet. If you end up liking it there are lots of other recipes you can use it in. The traditional way of making it can be pretty spicy with the use of hot peppers, and here they’re using a red pepper, as well as chile flakes, so it will be a bit spicy, but you can make adjustments to it depending on your personal taste.
I had never heard of the Paleo diet before I read this book but as a Mexican Cookbook it is really good. There are the recipes you would expect to see - empanadas, enchiladas, fajitas and such plus many recipes I have never seen before. There are lots of yummy looking recipes that I will be trying out. I am especially looking forward to trying the Salted Chocolate Ganache Tarts!

Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
Slow Cooked Garlic Artichokes Sautéed Swiss Chard With Bacon Sautéed Garlic Broccolini Grilled Balsamic Glazed Portobello Mushrooms Garlic Green Beans Roasted Mushrooms With Thyme Vegetables in a Creamy Pesto Sauce Spaghetti Squash with Creamy Mushroom Sauce Jalapeno Poppers Creamy Garlic Mushrooms Apple and Vegetable Stir-Fry Mini Pepperoni Pizza Bites Brussels Sprouts With Balsamic and Cranberries Sausage-Stuffed Jalapeño Bites Sweet Potato Bacon Cakes Creamed Spinach Mini Hamburger Bites Oven Roasted Garlic Cabbage Spicy Sweet Potato Wedges Cauliflower Tortillas Sweet Potato Bites with Guacamole and Bacon Zucchini cakes Roasted cauliflower with mint and pomegranate BLT Endive Bites Bell Pepper Pizza Bites Cauliflower and Bacon Hash Pesto Stuffed Mushrooms Oven Fried Pickles
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
Stack these bacon breakfast sandwiches nice and tall and you’ll have a formidable breakfast you’ll want to slow down for. The key is starting with a Paleo-approved bread and using thick cut bacon. Cutting the bacon nice and thick gives it a different quality than typical breakfast bacon and you’ll get more meaty flavor in each bite. Top the bacon with an egg, and add in some fresh spinach so you’re getting a serving of veggies too.
Description: Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what’s making us fat—and how we can change—in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes’s crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.
While paleo's most vocal advocates include committed athletes and fitness-first type of people, that doesn't mean that the benefits of eating paleo are limited to hardcore workout junkies. Paleo is great for anyone who wants pretty simple guidelines and feels their best on a diet rich in protein, fat, and greens. We always recommend eating the way that works best for you; there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Paleo is a great way to dip into clean eating, and with some trial and error you should be able to decide if it's an approach that works for you.
Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.
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