Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.
If Indian food is one of your favorite cuisines be sure to try out this fried beef recipe, which gets the Paleo seal of approval. It’s made with hearty chunks of beef stew meat, and has a list of seasonings you may have to go shopping for, but it will be worth it. These include turmeric and garam masala, both of which will act to give it that distinct Indian flavor. The meat is marinated, and then sauteed, with spices and seasonings added to both steps, so you know that this is going to knock your socks off, and the meat will be tender and flavorful.
The Nom Nom Paleo book brings humor and play into the kitchen. Created by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong, the married couple behind the Nom Nom Paleo food blog, this book contains over 100 foolproof recipes in this paleo diet cookbook that are great for all the family. Just in case gorgeous photos aren’t enough, this book also comes with cute cartoons.
The idea behind the paleo diet is that the human digestive system can handle these unprocessed foods much better than it can digest modern-day products like dairy, grains, and sugars. Many people stand by this diet as an effective method for weight loss, cleaning eating, and overall healthy living. Though, as with many fad diets, this can be restrictive since you don't eat dairy or whole grains, so you should consult with your doctor before trying this or any other extreme diet. 
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.

Just to say Thank You for checking out this book I want to give you a copy of my upcoming book "The Paleo Approach Pantry: A Paleo... for Beginner's Quick Start Guide to What Should and Should NOT be in Your Kitchen."We live in an era of Overnight Evolution.It seems like the great minds of Science and Medicine break new ground every other day, revealing knowledge and inventing technologies that our Paleolithic ancestors would see as nothing short of miraculous.Yep, we’ve come a long way in the last 10,000 years. But the more advanced we become in our understanding of health and nutrition, the more obvious it is that the cave dwellers had it right all along!And that’s what being a Paleoite is all about: Going back to the basics and sticking to the diet that made our ancestors physically and biologically healthy enough to grow into the dominant species on Earth.The thing is, our taste buds have evolved too, and we don’t have to spend all day trying to brave the elements and protect our families from starvation like they did!We live in the age of options, and abstaining from our favorite grain and dairy-based comfort foods feels about as right as living in a cave.But that’s not how it has to be, and bestselling author Lucy Fast is here to prove it!“Paleo Comfort Food: Healing Gluten Free Recipes that Make You Feel Good!” will change the way you think about your diet. With Paleo recipes for more than 30 mouthwatering comfort food classics, you’ll get to reap the benefits of Ideal Nutrition without feeling like your tongue got stuck in Stone Age!In this guide you will learn:• How to prepare Incredibly Nutritious and Delicious Bone Broth• How to make Lucy’s Creamy Caveman Chowder• How to bring out your inner aboriginal with the Island Style Paleo Soup• How to cook glorious Gluten-free Won tons• How to cook an array of Soul-Warming Stews, Casseroles and Curries• How to make Lucy’s Mighty Meaty Lasagna• How to make Back to Basics Stuffing• And so much more!As a lifelong foodie and proud Paleoite, Lucy Fast knows first-hand just hard it can be to find the balance between eating basic and eating well, especially with a family to cook for. But where there’s a will there’s a way, and now you can follow her lead!Get your copy of “Paleo Comfort Food: Healing Gluten Free Recipes that Make You Feel Good!” and start putting the soul back into your Paleo cooking today! read more


Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.

Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.

Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.


Eating Paleo is as hard or easy as having the right recipes to follow. Go into it alone and try to figure it out solo, and you’ll probably crash and burn. Go into it armed with an arsenal of delicious recipes already planned out for you, and in accordance with the Paleo guidelines of what to eat and what not to eat, and your chances of success improve dramatically. Here are the Top 10 Paleo Diet Cookbooks on the planet, so you can get the junk out of your life and start eating real, actual, food.
×