The Paleo diet has become a global success. Also known as the Caveman diet, the Primal diet, and the Stone Age diet, the reasons f...or the Paleo diet's success are obvious: it is the way humans were intended to eat. Obesity, chronic disease, diabetes, heart disease, celiac disease, and cancer rates are at all time highs, and scientific evidence shows that this is directly related to the Standard American Diet. We need to rid ourselves of the processed foods that are ruining our health. The Paleo diet is not another fad diet. Instead it focuses on unprocessed nutrient-dense foods that can help you to: Lose weight Burn fat Boost metabolism Build muscle Relieve stress Improve your health But how does it all work and how do you begin? Paleo for Beginners explains how the Paleo diet works, and how easy it is to adjust your lifestyle and reap all the benefits Paleo has to offer. read more
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)

It’s official—the REAL Paleo Diet is back. Loved for its simplicity, health benefits, and because it really works, the diet has been widely imitated since its release. Yet no one knows this plan better than the world’s leading expert and Founder of the Paleo movement, Dr. Loren Cordain. As an leader in evolutionary medicine, Dr. Cordain realized we’ve moved away from the foods we were designed to eat — lean proteins, fruits, and vegetables — while modern staples such as sugar, salt, and carbohydrates were creating a host of 21st-century health issues, including obesity and heart disease. By eating the right food, people are healthier. But can eating Paleo be tasty?
This recipe idea came from her, she has a staple chicken salad recipe that she makes weekly, and we get really creative with 100 million ways we can eat it. After finding these completely Paleo wraps, we decided to stuff them with her chicken salad. It was deeelicious. I love all different kinds of chicken salad. I actually have another Chicken Salad Recipe on my blog, which is a bit more complicated. This one that I’ll share today is much easier and perfect to make each week. 

Chicken Curry Salad Ingredients: - 4 chicken breasts - 2 cups green grapes - 1/3 cup Paleo Mayo - 1 heaping tablespoon curry powde...r - 2 heaping tablespoons honey (or more!) - 1/2 cup slivered almonds - Sea salt (to taste) - Black pepper (to taste) Steps: 1. Cover your baking sheet with aluminum foil. 2. Set broiler on high, arranging rack so that the chicken will be about 2 inches from the heat. 3. Rinse your chicken breasts and cut off any excess fat. 4. Place chicken breasts side by side on baking sheets. 5. Sprinkle sea salt and pepper, to taste. Place chicken in oven and broil for 14 minutes. 6. Carefully flip each chicken breast, and place back in oven for it to continue to broil for another 14 minutes. 7. Once chicken cools off, grab your sharp knife and cut all four chicken breasts into small squares. 8. Place chicken, grapes, and slivered almonds in your mixing bowl; using your wooden spoon, mix them together. 9. In a separate bowl, mix your Paleo Mayo, honey and curry powder. Once combined, add it to your chicken, grapes and almond mix. 10. Eat right away or store in the refrigerator. Grab the book to get more paleo recipes now! read more

Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.

These Paleo pizza bites will blow you away with their pizza flavor. She’s managed to make them extra delicious even though there isn’t any cheese in them at all. They look like little baked meatballs, but the cool thing about them is the way they burst with flavor when you eat them. It’s the Italian sausage that gives them the intense flavor, as well as the accompanying ingredients like bell peppers and mushrooms, just like you’d find on a pizza.


On most diet plans, bacon gets the axe because of all the fat it contains. But since it is OK on the Paleo diet, they tend to use it whenever they can. In this case they’ve decided to wrap up chicken breast in bacon before barbecuing it. Now, you may be thinking this is pretty unhealthy, but just look at their serving suggestion of topping a salad with these bacon wrapped barbecue chicken slices. It’s not a matter of an all you can eat bacon buffet, but instead is something you can enjoy in moderation, along with a hearty serving of vegetables.
Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.

Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.

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