Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
At some point on the Paleo diet you’re going to crave something sweet, flavorful, and crunchy, and that’s when we’d recommend baking up a batch of these clusters. They use pumpkin seeds, and we’re just finding out how healthy these are, and the benefits they provide. The sweetness comes from coconut sugar and honey, two approved sources of sweet on Paleo. We recommend going with organic raw honey to avoid the processed kind you find on store shelves. The other ingredients are all-natural, just be sure to use organic pumpkin seeds for the best results.
This chicken salad keeps things light and has an eclectic mix of meat, fruit, and vegetables, so you’ll feel great after eating it. While some might think that Paleo eating doesn’t include salads, this is a misperception. In fact, you’ll likely end up eating more salads than you ever did before so you can balance out a meal. This salad makes a great lunch, and will surely give you energy to help you through the rest of the day, without a sluggish after lunch feeling. Consider using baby spinach or baby kale leaves instead of ordinary lettuce for the base.
This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.
A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.

Practical Paleo is more than just a recipe book. Instead, the book acts as a particularly effective introduction to the paleo diet, offering information and steps about what you can expect from the beginning all the way through. Some of this information may even be new to people who have been following paleo for a while, especially as there is a discussion about gut bacteria and various ways to live a paleo lifestyle effectively.


Savor the flavor of this carrot soup, which has been enhanced with traditional Moroccan spices. Turmeric, paprika, and cinnamon round things out here, and they’ve served it up with a side of kale crisps for additional flavor. You can also add pomegranates to the soup as a garnish which provides extra nutrition and gives it a nice color contrast. This is a fitting example of the caliber of foods you can make while still following the Paleo lifestyle.

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The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
The book does also have a wide selection of different types of recipes, including dinners, desserts and snacks. This is both a good and a bad thing, depending on what you’re looking for. In particular, the style is great for variety. But, if you’re specifically looking for main meals, you may be disappointed, as a significant proportion of the recipes are for snacks and desserts.
The Summer Eats collection of recipes is unlike anything we’ve seen in the world of Paleo. These are like gourmet meals done in Paleo fashion, so you’ll feel like you’re getting well-fed, but keeping healthy at the same time. She’s gone for quality over quantity, so you won’t be inundated with hundreds of recipes, and in fact she’s providing just 16 recipes designed to knock your socks off. This is the type of recipe collection you’ll want to have on hand when you want a special meal, but don’t want to veer off your Paleo plan. She also provides recipes for clean cocktails, so you can enjoy a tasty beverage without packing on the calories and sugar.

Description: ‘The Ketogenic Diet’ is a complete resource for anyone interested in low-carbohydrate diets (such as the Atkins Diet, Protein Power, Bodyopus or the Anabolic Diet). It looks objectively at the physiology behind such diets, including potential negative effects, and gives specific recommendations on how to optimize such a diet assuming an individual has chosen to do one. Two modified ketogenic diets (which involve the insertion of carbohydrates to sustain exercise performance) are also discussed in detail, along with specific guidelines. Exercise is discussed in great detail, including background physiology, the effects of exercise on fat loss, exercise guidelines and sample workouts. A great deal of basic physiology information, dealing with both nutrition and exercise topics, is included so that readers without a technical background will be able to understand the topics discussed.
If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.
This cookbook companion to "The Paleo Approach" offers a wealth of information. It shows you how to make a smooth transition to the diet — whether you're a novice in the kitchen, on a tight budget or limited on time. Author Sarah Ballantyne specifically addresses readers with autoimmune diseases, yet "The Paleo Approach Cookbook" has universal appeal thanks to its user-friendly mix of flavorful recipes and insightful kitchen tips.
Wondering what to eat on the Paleo diet? Explore PaleoPlan’s 450+ easy and delicious Paleo recipes—all absolutely free! Our recipes are a fast and healthy way to lose weight, feel better, and get in shape on the Paleo diet. From breakfast to dinner, we have a variety of meals for every occasion. With so many amazing recipe options to choose from, you’re sure to find a delicious, satisfying, and 100% Paleo diet meal that’s perfect for you, your family and friends.

Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
When you switch to a Paleo Diet, you will enjoy a lot of benefits. The benefits of this way of eating include more energy, weight loss, freedom from gastrointestinal problems, better mental clarity, relief from chronic conditions, improved skin and hair and so much more. The book will make it easy for you to achieve these benefits, even if you haven’t followed a Paleo diet before. All you have to do is follow the recipes and you will start to see the effects on your body quite quickly.

Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.


At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.


Danielle Walker believes the right foods improve health and mental awareness!  The simplicity of how these are put together will surprise and delight, so you don’t have to be a master chef to have the ability to prepare them.  There is amazing variety here as well, from braising to one pot dishes to thirty minute meals and more—there are choices for everyone.  For those who have busy weeknights, you’ll never have to worry again.

Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
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