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This cookbook companion to "The Paleo Approach" offers a wealth of information. It shows you how to make a smooth transition to the diet — whether you're a novice in the kitchen, on a tight budget or limited on time. Author Sarah Ballantyne specifically addresses readers with autoimmune diseases, yet "The Paleo Approach Cookbook" has universal appeal thanks to its user-friendly mix of flavorful recipes and insightful kitchen tips.
Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.

While paleo's most vocal advocates include committed athletes and fitness-first type of people, that doesn't mean that the benefits of eating paleo are limited to hardcore workout junkies. Paleo is great for anyone who wants pretty simple guidelines and feels their best on a diet rich in protein, fat, and greens. We always recommend eating the way that works best for you; there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Paleo is a great way to dip into clean eating, and with some trial and error you should be able to decide if it's an approach that works for you.
On most diet plans, bacon gets the axe because of all the fat it contains. But since it is OK on the Paleo diet, they tend to use it whenever they can. In this case they’ve decided to wrap up chicken breast in bacon before barbecuing it. Now, you may be thinking this is pretty unhealthy, but just look at their serving suggestion of topping a salad with these bacon wrapped barbecue chicken slices. It’s not a matter of an all you can eat bacon buffet, but instead is something you can enjoy in moderation, along with a hearty serving of vegetables.
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.

If you thought pulled pork sliders were off the menu, you were wrong. You just have to find creative workarounds when you are making Paleo recipes. In this case they’ve replaced hamburger buns with sliced sweet potato, which gets the wheat out. They haven’t skimped on the pulled pork which is going to taste just like you’d expect it to if you ordered a pulled pork sandwich from a barbecue joint. Creativity is one of the main and factors when you are eating Paleo because nothing is really off limits, you just have to figure out how you can have it.


When it comes to those recipes, a key advantage is the speed. Most options are designed to be fast to make. Likewise, the formatting of the recipes makes it easy to be efficient throughout the process. While the book doesn’t offer images of every recipe, there are more than enough photographs to keep the book interesting and to guide you on your cooking journey.
What sort of stuff is in the book? This book is centered around the 100+ amazing recipes I’ve developed for you. It’s got seven fueling strategies (when training falls at different times during the day), and fifty meal combinations (think of it like the beginnings of a meal plan). The macros for each recipe are provided. This book discusses performance nutrition in a limited manner, so if you’re after the detailed rationale behind why Paleo is awesome for athletes, I recommend also picking up my ebook, The Paleo Athlete.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
1. One Pan Balsamic Chicken and Veggies: This super healthy and nutritious meal features chicken breasts and the veggies of your choice, all topped with a delicious balsamic and Italian dressing. Pro tip: As with all of these recipes, make sure to wait until you’re ready to eat before you add any glazes or dressings on top. (via Chelsea’s Messy Apron)
Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.
Introducing paleo food to a family can be tough, especially as many people are resistant to the idea. As a result, this cookbook offers one potential way around the problem, by focusing on recipes that aren’t obviously paleo. The meals would also work well for many families because they don’t use incredibly obscure ingredients and often don’t have as many steps as other paleo recipes.
These meatballs attempt to capture the taste of chicken enchiladas verde, so if you don’t feel like making up a giant pan of Paleo friendly enchiladas, you can go with this meatball recipe and get a similar results. They are able to pull it off by using a pound of ground chicken, and you want to make sure that the chicken is organic. They are using almond flour to replace breadcrumbs that you’ll usually find in meatball recipes to help hold it all together. They also have it topped with some salsa verde to complete the green enchilada mission.
Everybody gets their own mini personal pizza when you cook up these squash pizzas. Each slice of squash becomes a tiny sized pizza that is loaded up with Paleo friendly toppings. It’s a great way to use up that butternut squash you bought, and simply requires that you top them up with items that you like. They’re recommending meats and veggies so you can keep it Paleo, and really as long as you stick with those two types of foods you’ll be doing just fine.

In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.


Butternut squash is great for you, kale is fantastic for you, so in this recipe you’re already starting off on the right foot. Next, add in some beef and you’re doing just dandy in regards to Paleo eating. That’s because you’re getting plenty of nutrition from the kale and squash, as well as the requisite protein from the beef, so you’ll feel satiated at the end of the bowl, and this is a stew that eats like a meal because it is a meal, it just happens to be in a bowl. You brown the meat in bacon fat, giving it wild amounts of flavor.
Butternut squash is great for you, kale is fantastic for you, so in this recipe you’re already starting off on the right foot. Next, add in some beef and you’re doing just dandy in regards to Paleo eating. That’s because you’re getting plenty of nutrition from the kale and squash, as well as the requisite protein from the beef, so you’ll feel satiated at the end of the bowl, and this is a stew that eats like a meal because it is a meal, it just happens to be in a bowl. You brown the meat in bacon fat, giving it wild amounts of flavor.

The recipes are incredible and the photography is gorgeous. I love how this book  is organized in menus, and each menu gives you tips on how to prepare for the party efficiently. My other favorite part of this book is that most of the recipes use simple, fresh ingredients.  If you are already a real-foodie, you likely have most of the ingredients on hand.CLICK HERE to order Gather.


This Crock Pot roast has everything you’d want from a traditional Sunday roast, all in one pot. The beauty of it is that everything comes out perfectly cooked so the meat is very tender and juicy and the carrots, celery, onions, and cauliflower all come out soft and ready to eat. A major bonus to this is just how easy it is to get everything prepared and put into the slow cooker. Most roasts will have you checking in on it from time to time, but this one let’s you relax for about 8 hours before you have to do anything else to it.
With Paleo it is important to use the proper amount of spices and seasonings so that you don’t get tired of just eating meat and vegetables all the time. In this recipe they have an interesting mix of spices, and use plenty of lime so you’ll get a citrusy, spicy flavor. It starts off with chicken thighs and breasts, and then coats it all in olive oil so the spices will stick to the meat better. They’re using coriander, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and sea salt so this is definitely not lacking in the flavor department.
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1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)
This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
Mickey Trescott has created a life-changing resource for anyone who finds themselves suffering from chronic illness or an autoimmune disease. This incredible Paleo cookbook is designed especially for this purpose. It even includes two four-week meal plans to help get your health back on track and manage your chronic illness. While there are several cookbooks that focus on the many health benefits of a Paleo diet, this might just be the best one for those suffering from the specific issue.

Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).


The pretty and sophisticated recipes are all fine and dandy, but more often than not what we really need on a day to day basis is a bunch of quick and easy recipes that we can prepare without much involvement or fancy ingredients. It surely helps us stick to Paleo when cooking doesn’t seem like a chore or a puzzle three times a day. You’ve got to have some time off from the kitchen and still be able to eat the best food for your health.
If you thought pulled pork sliders were off the menu, you were wrong. You just have to find creative workarounds when you are making Paleo recipes. In this case they’ve replaced hamburger buns with sliced sweet potato, which gets the wheat out. They haven’t skimped on the pulled pork which is going to taste just like you’d expect it to if you ordered a pulled pork sandwich from a barbecue joint. Creativity is one of the main and factors when you are eating Paleo because nothing is really off limits, you just have to figure out how you can have it.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
Talk about a company-worthy meal without much effort or a hefty price tag. Serve this easy and elegant entrée over a bed of greens and with a side of steamed broccoli. Chicken thighs offer darker meat with more flavor than chicken breasts. Madras curry is a medium/hot, red curry sauce that possesses a strong chili powder flavor. Paired with the sweet flavor of pomegranate seeds and fresh mint, this chicken dish does not overwhelm the palate. This easy chicken dish is the perfect paleo weeknight dinner, as it requires very little preparation and is ready to serve almost immediately.
Ultimately, the best way to lose weight is to cut calories, eat a variety of nutritious foods, and exercise regularly. Some dietitians believe that a paleo diet, with limited carbohydrates and plenty of whole, nutritious foods, can be an effective part of a weight loss regimen. Always consult a physician to determine the best weight loss approach for you individually.

These meatballs attempt to capture the taste of chicken enchiladas verde, so if you don’t feel like making up a giant pan of Paleo friendly enchiladas, you can go with this meatball recipe and get a similar results. They are able to pull it off by using a pound of ground chicken, and you want to make sure that the chicken is organic. They are using almond flour to replace breadcrumbs that you’ll usually find in meatball recipes to help hold it all together. They also have it topped with some salsa verde to complete the green enchilada mission.


Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?
Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.
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