This cod gets dusted with ginger powder, as well as salt and pepper to keep things very simple, but very delicious. As you see it’s served next to a salad made from zucchini which has been spiralized into ribbons, and gets steamed to keep it very healthy. The whole lot is then covered with a blend of vinegar, soy sauce, honey, and sesame oil, so it’s not too dry and is full of flavor. The cod and zucchini go together very well, making this a light meal you can use as a lunch, or dinner.
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
Tacos can be tricky to make Paleo, but they’ve figured out a good way here by using portobello mushroom caps for the shells. These caps do a good job of holding all of the yummy taco-inspired ingredients, and by the time you finish one of these you’ll feel satisfied, and like you just had Taco Night. The thick texture of the mushrooms means you can pile on the taco toppings and you won’t have to worry about breaking the shell.

This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.

This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
This is a wonderful green bean salad that will be bursting with flavor. Go with organic green beans and you’ll be able to tell the difference in how they taste. The additional ingredients are all Paleo inspired, with walnuts as a source of healthy fat, something that you’re supposed to get enough of each day you’re on Paleo. She’s also using a red onion, and olive oil. Olive oil is additional healthy fat, and the Paleo diet is one of the few diets out there that places such a primary importance on getting healthy fats into your body.
Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.
Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.

Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
Cookie bars are like cookies, but they’re thicker and have more of the good stuff per square inch because of their size and shape. That means you’re getting the cookie experience you’re craving, but in a handy bar form that will leave you more satisfied. These bars are in the style of chocolate chip, quite possibly the most popular cookie choice in America. The only thing is you won’t want to dunk these in a glass of cow’s milk, but you can feel free to have almond milk with them, and they actually contain almond milk as well.

Regardless of the origin of the name, the caveman diet has many of the same principles as the paleo diet. It’s focused primarily on the consumption of higher quantities of real, unprocessed, non-packaged food that cavemen could have eaten thousands of years ago, before Safeway, Walmart, and all of the other mega-super-duper-grocery stores we have available in today’s world came into being. Here are the basics:
i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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